Uk Us Extradition Agreement

Since we agreed on the extradition treaty between Britain and the United States in 2003, it has been quite clear that the British Government has today reached a truly horrible agreement – asymmetrical, sometimes ineffective and often unfair to British citizens. Countless examples in the last one have shown in the year that from the Three NatWest to Christopher Tappin, from Gary McKinnon to Anne Sacoolas, the person accused of causing the death by dangerous driving of Harry Dunn. We risk another serious miscarriage of justice with the US extradition request for Dr Mike Lynch, a successful and entrepreneurial British businessman. Dr Lynch created an innovative data processing company, Autonomy, which was the UK`s largest leading software company until 2010. In 2011, it was sold for £9 billion to Hewlett-Packard. On September 30, 27, 2006, the U.S. Senate unanimously ratified the treaty. [16] Home Minister John Reid said he was “delighted” that Baroness Scotland`s visit to the United States had succeeded this summer in obtaining Senate approval and said: “The treaty is an important measure in our fight against serious international crime.” [17] In 2012, one of the most frequent criticisms of extradition agreements between the United States and the United Kingdom was summarized by the Civil Liberties Committee as follows: “[The United States] has the power to reach the whole world and, if there is a very, very weak link with the United States, it generally has the power to prosecute.” This issue has been discussed on several occasions, in particular in the case of the “NatWest Three”, where the Divisional Court found that the 2003 Act does not provide for any discretion in refusing extradition on the ground that the appropriate processor was the United Kingdom, unless a human rights ground was presented. . . .

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